AI4FR Virtual Shack Tour 

The AI4FR Electronic workshop

  

The electronic workshop is in one section of the three car garage. This single car garage has been divided from the other two by a wall and a door. Basically if it was not for the large garage door seen at the left edge of the picture on the left this would appear as an additional room.

The picture on the left was taken from the doorway leading into the shop from the house. Upon leaving this house doorway open it cools the shop from the house AC. In this picture the entire workbench can be seen.

The picture on the right is of the right end of the workbench. The red storage unit on the right is filled with resistors. The resistors are organized by their first two numbers of resistance. For example a 10 ohm, 100 ohm, 1000 ohm, 10,000 ohm, and so on is all grouped together. This system continues for each different value of resistor: 10, 12, 15, 18, 22, 27...etc. So if I need a 27 meg resistor(27,000,000 ohms) I look in the bin marked 27. Next I find the proper size(1/4, 1/3, 1 watt or so on). The blue storage bin next to it contains LED's, IC's, Diode's, Transistor's, shunt's, Bridge's, Rectifier's and so forth. The two smaller storage bins on top of the blue one contains capacitors. In here we find A/C, Doorknob and small variable capacitors. The next two storage bins contain capacitors as well. The red one in front contains smaller capacitors from 1uf down to the picofarad range. The capacitors in this red bin are arranged by capacitance. The bin behind this one contains electrolytic capacitors which are sorted by voltage. The piece of test equipment sitting on top of this is a Sprague Tel-Ohmike model TO-5.

Moving to the left the large item is an HP 606A signal generator. This signal generator gets the most use as compared to the others described in the pictures below.  On the right top corner of the HP 606A is a Motorola base station power supply. This power supply is the one I use when working on modern transceivers or any time when 13.6 volts DC is needed. On top of the Motorola is a Heathkit model IT-12 signal tracer. To its left is a HP milliammeter model 428B. To its left is an HP VTVM model 410B.

Almost out of view and mostly hid by the HP 606A is a greenish Weller soldering station model WTCPN.

  

  

The picture on the left shows the main work area. With-in easy reach is a DMM, VTVM, signal generator, a couple of Oscilloscopes, capacitor/diode/inductor analyzer, variable & fixed power supply's, and frequency counters.

  

The picture on the right is of some of these items talked about directly above. Starting at the top right is a Fluke 8024b sitting on a Conar signal tracer model 230. The Conar is sitting on an Hitachi 100 MHz O-scope model V-1065A. Directly under the Hitachi and under the shelf is a Fluke DMM model 8050A. The Fluke is sitting on a Sencore LC75 capacitor/diode/inductor analyzer. At the bottom is a Tektronix 5Hz-175MHz  frequency counter model CDC 250.

The next column of equipment is as follows: at the bottom is a BK Precision 5Hz-520MHz frequency counter model 1850. Right above it is an HP 100 MHz O-scope model 1740A. Sitting on top of the HP scope is a Sencore model SCR-256 which is a SCR & Triac test accessory for the Sencore LC75(right side of HP scope). On the shelf above this column we have a BK Precision solid state signal generator model E200 D. The black box sitting on the top right of the BK signal generator is a EICO R-C combination box(decade box) model 1140. The EICO decade box allows me to quickly switch in both resistors and capacitors in both series and parallel combinations. Just to its left is a Tenma ESR meter model 72-6355.

Starting at the bottom of the next column is a Bird 4431 Watt meter and behind it is a BK Precision isolation transformer model TR-110.

At the next column the item with the center black knob with the two meters is an adjustable 20 volt 20 amp DC power supply. Sitting right on top of it is an MFJ-264 dummy load. Right above these items on the shelf is a gray vice and to its left is a Heathkit IT-10 transistor/diode checker.

The last column on the left of the right picture at the bottom is a HP 54200 D Digitizing oscilloscope. On top of this in the white plastic case is a HAKKO 808 de-soldering gun. On the shelf above these items is a MFJ-269 HF/VHF/UHF SWR analyzer and counter(inside the black Pelican case). The silver faced square item next to it is a Sencore VA-48 TV-VTR-MATV & Video Analyzer.  

The picture on the left is of the end of the electronic workbench. To the left of the HP scope we have a Precision tube tester model 912. To its left is the tube tester that gets the most use which is a Sencore TC-142 Mighty might V. Next to it is a 12 volt DC power supply made by Vista model XX-R. The gray thing at the end is a Heathkit signal generator model SG-8. In the far corner and almost out of sight is a Hallicrafters FM-48.

The photograph on the right is a view of the workbench from the opposite end.

  

  

These next two photographs show the other end of the electronic shop with its additional parts storage.

  

  

The photograph on the left is what the wall just opposite of the workbench looks like. In the corner near the garage door is three of the five computers that are crunching numbers for BOINC as briefly described at the bottom of the home page here. The computer hutch contains several electronic reference books.

Next we have a small folder storage cabinet which is filled with instruction and service manuals.

The black box on the floor with the cardboard box(corrugated liner board box for those in that industry) on top of it is a Motorola S 1075C deviation monitor and synthesizer. It was made by Systron-Donner Corp. for Motorola.

The last item is a small table that holds a Hallicrafters SX-28, Hallicrafters S-36, and a Hammarlund SP-600-JX-17.

  

The photograph on the right was taken from inside the two car garage section. The door is normally kept shut in order to allow more efficient cooling of the work area from the house AC. The plastic tubs on the black shelf contain tubes which are all sorted by their respective number.  

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