AI4FR Virtual Shack Tour 

CW Items

 

These old coils are really neat items to have around from a past era of amateur radio history among others. This one was manufactured by the K-W company. These coils were produced by many different companies including the Jefferson Electric Company

The photograph on the left is of the points and vibrator section of the coil. The photograph on the right is of the top.

These coils were originally intended for items such as signs, automobiles, trains, toys, and anywhere a high tension spark was needed. Early one, two and four cylinder engines used these with batteries to provide ignition. These coils have also been used for the ignition of WWII flame throwers, roofing tar heaters, home heating plants, spark plug testers, fence chargers, railroad track cars, and of course radio spark gap transmitters. Other names for this item is buzz-coil and trembler coil.

The coil has three connecting points. One is for the power source which was usually a battery. The positive from the battery would be connected to this post. The second connecting point was for ground. The third connecting point was the output such as connection to a sparkplug. These coils also have an adjustment called a tension nut. The operator would turn the tension nut until the highest pitched tone was heard from the coil and upon doing so allowed the coil to produce the hottest spark possible.  

 

  

In these next two photographs both the left and right sides of the K-W coil are shown.  

Unlike the Jefferson Electric Company Coil, the K-W company choose to put their logo on the bottom. Notice the ink stamp underneath the round K-W logo. It proudly states "Made in U.S.A.". This is a marking that is sadly becoming extinct.

  

  

  

The photograph on the left is a close side view up of the points and clicker. The photograph on the right is a close up of the bar that is on the top of the points in the picture on the left. This metal bar has the K-W makers logo stamped on it as well as a patent date of 1914 which is the same year that WWI started. The U.S. did not enter the war until 3 years later in 1917.  

      AI4FR                                                                                                                                                                                                  AI4FR                                                                                                       AI4FR

Copyright © John Whitt 2017 All rights reserved.