AI4FR Virtual Militaria Items Tour 

German Items

 

The medal on the left is Treudienst-Ehrenzeichen fur Beamte Angestellte und Arbeiter im offentlichen Dients Stufe in Silber or The Civil Service Faithful Service Medal in Silver. This medal was founded on the 30th of January 1938, as a reward to civilians in the employ of the public services for 25 year or more of faithful service. The reverse of the cross was stamped with 'Für Treue Dienst' or For Faithful Service. For 40 years or more of faithful service the medal is gold rather then silver.

The metal on the right is a WWI version of the Verwundetenabzeichen or Wound badge medal. Please see the description for the WWII version directly below for a more detailed explanation of this medal.  

The medal on the left is a Ostmedaille(East Medal) or Russian Front Medal. This medal was introduced on May 26th 1942 to recognize those who participated and endured the freezing and challenging months in the 1st winter of Operation Barbarossa(invasion of the Soviet Union). Unique in that its designer was a contemporary serving soldier, SS-Unterscharführer Ernst Krause, the medal was held in high regard by all branches of the Wehrmacht. On the reverse it has the inscription "WINTERSCHLACHT IM OSTEN 1941/42" (Winter Battle in the East) in capital letters with a sword and wreath of leaves crossed under it.

A ribbon that accompanied the medal was colored red , white and black (symbolic of blood, snow and death). The medal and ribbon were usually presented in a paper packet, but these were invariably discarded. Over 3 million were made by more than 26 confirmed firms by the time the order was officially decommissioned by Oberkommando der Wehrmacht on September 4th, 1944.

The metal on the right is a WWII version of the Verwundetenabzeichen or Wound badge medal. This item was awarded to wounded or frost-bitten soldiers of Reichswehr, Wehrmacht, SS and the auxiliary service organizations. Then, after March of 1943 due to the increasing number of allied bombings it was also to civilians.

First instituted during World War I it existed in three versions: black for one or two times wounded by hostile action or air raid, or frost-bite in the line of duty, silver for three or four times wounded, loss of a hand, foot or eye via hostile action (also partial loss of hearing), facial disfigurement or brain damage via hostile action and gold (can be awarded posthumously) for five or more times wounded, total blindness or severe brain damage via hostile action. They exist in pressed steel, brass and zinc as well as pure base metal privately commissioned versions. Those of the First World War were also produced in a cutout pattern. All versions of the Wound Badge were worn on the lower left breast of the uniform or tunic and below all other awards. It is assumed that upwards of 5 million were likely awarded during World War II. In 1957, a revised version of the Wound Badge was authorized for wear, however the previous type could still be worn if the swastika was removed (for example by grinding).  

The medal on the left is close up, as well as another example of the Ostmedaille(East Medal) or Russian Front Medal that is in the collection. Please see the description for the medal directly above for a more detailed explanation of this medal.  

The item on the right is a German Polizei(Police) 1942 Badge.  

On the left is a Landwehr or Defense of the Country Reserve 2 Class Medal.

On the right is a Tag Der Arbeit or Day of Work 1934 Tinnie.  

On the left is a Tag Der Arbeit or Day of Work 1934 Tinnie. As can be seen, this one shows some corrosion.

On the right is a March 29 1936 Freiheit und Brot or Freedom and Bread tinnie.

  

This is a WWI version of the Verwundetenabzeichen or Wound badge medal. This item was awarded to wounded or frost-bitten soldiers of Reichswehr, Wehrmacht, SS and the auxiliary service organizations. Then, after March of 1943 due to the increasing number of allied bombings it was also to civilians.

First instituted during World War I it existed in three versions: black for one or two times wounded by hostile action or air raid, or frost-bite in the line of duty, silver for three or four times wounded, loss of a hand, foot or eye via hostile action (also partial loss of hearing), facial disfigurement or brain damage via hostile action and gold (can be awarded posthumously) for five or more times wounded, total blindness or severe brain damage via hostile action. They exist in pressed steel, brass and zinc as well as pure base metal privately commissioned versions. Those of the First World War were also produced in a cutout pattern. All versions of the Wound Badge were worn on the lower left breast of the uniform or tunic and below all other awards. It is assumed that upwards of 5 million were likely awarded during World War II. In 1957, a revised version of the Wound Badge was authorized for wear, however the previous type could still be worn if the swastika was removed (for example by grinding).  

On the left is the Ehrenkreuz der deutschen Mutter or more colloquially Mutterkreuz or German Mothers Cross. This award was instituted on December 16, 1938 as part of Hitler's initiative to encourage Aryan population growth, and so only women with pure Aryan families could achieve such awards. 

Women from absorbed Germanic countries (such as Austria and Danzig) were also eligible. A mother could be awarded a bronze, silver, or gold cross depending on the number of children she had produced. Eight would entitle the woman to a gold cross, six to silver, and four for bronze. The above example is in bronze.

There were also unconfirmed reports that a Golden Cross with Diamonds existed and was awarded to a small number of women who bore between twelve and fourteen children. The crosses were awarded annually on August 12 (Hitler's mother's birthday), and the second Sunday in May (Mothering Sunday), hence the first of these were not awarded until 1939. Mothers who received a cross were to be saluted in the streets by the Hitler Youth upon parades, for service to Germany.

On the right is the Kriegsverdienstmedaille or War Merit medal 3rd class. This medal without swords was awarded to non-combatants starting in 1940 in order to offset the large number of 2nd class without swords medals that were being awarded. It was usually given to those workers in factories who significantly exceeded work quotas.  

On the left is the Kriegsverdienstkreuz or War Merit Cross. This award was created by Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars (same medal but with a different ribbon). The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty (but not worthy of an Iron Cross which was more a bravery award), and without swords for meritorious service behind the lines which could also be awarded to civilians. Recipients had to have the lower grade of the award before getting the next level. It was reissued in 1957 by the Bundeswehr in a De-Nazified version for veterans.  

In the first picture on the left, the right medal is The Eisernes Kreuz or Iron Cross. This metal has not been awarded since May of 1945 and is awarded only in wartime. It is normally a military decoration only although there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. 

As an example, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class by Adolf Hitler for her bravery as a test pilot and was one of only two women awarded the Iron Cross First Class during World War II. The Iron Cross originally was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattee), and the cross design (but not this specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1870. 

The photograph on the right is of a 1940 dated pin. More text coming soon.

On the left is a WWII German airplane Tinnie.

On the right is another March 29, 1936 Freiheit und Brot or Freedom and Bread tinnie that is in the collection.   

German WWII bomb Tinnie on the left. More text coming soon.

  

  

  

  

A small collection of German Tinnie's. More text coming soon.  

  

Resource:

Third Reich Militaria by Robin Lumsden

Detecting the fakes by Robin Lumsden

German uniforms of the third reich by Brian Davis & Pierre

SS regalia by Jack Pia

Soldat by Richard Mundt & Cyrus Lee

Soldat by Cyrus Lee

German army uniforms and insignai 1933-1945 by Brian Davis

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