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This Mauser pocket pistol model 1914 is a blowback design, striker fired, semi-automatic pistol that is chambered in 7.65mm(.32 ACP). The barrel is stationary or locked in place at all times but is easily removable for service. The pistol is fed by an 8 round detachable box magazine. It utilizes a blade type front sight and a V notch rear sight. The pistol uses a one piece wrap around Walnut wood grip. The total length of the pistol is 6.1 inches and it weighs in at an unloaded weight of 21 ounces. The pistol has a manual safety that is located on the left side of the frame and operated by the users thumb. The pistol also incorporates an automatic magazine safety which blocks the firing of the pistol when the magazine is removed. There is a slide hold-open device installed on this pistol, but once the slide is in the open position, it can only be released by inserting a fresh magazine either empty or charged.

This Mauser pocket pistol model 1914 was manufactured some time between 1923 and 1929. This 1914 post war is the most commonly found model of this version. This pistol has no military acceptance stamps so there is a good chance that it was originally intended for commercial sales.

The Mauser pocket pistol model 1914 gets it shape and appearance from the patents of the Mauser model 1907 pistol. The first of these pistols was the model 1910 which did not go into commercial sales until the original designs of the 1907 pistol patent had been considerably modified . The most noticeable of these changes was that the 1907 is a locked breech weapon while the 1910 is of the blowback design. The model 1910 which looks very similar to the pistol on this page is chambered for the 6.35mm(.25 ACP) cartridge.

In 1914 Mauser used the design of the model 1910 and built the model 1914 that is chambered for the larger 7.65mm(.32 ACP) round. The main difference between the two models was in the dimensions to accept the larger caliber round. There was also some minor design changes such as the lug at the rear of the barrel which is discussed in the pictures below. Then twenty years later in 1934, the factory director, August Weiß whose nickname was  "Parabellum-Weiß" came out with the final design to this pistol that changed the shape of the grip to fit more comfortably in the hand. All three models of this pistol, 1910, 1914 and the 1934 are mechanically identical. The parts can be easily interchanged between the model 1914 and the model 1934. Given that the three pistols look nearly the same, and are mechanically the same, and that the parts between two version can interchange, lends itself to a lot of confusion among collectors as to exactly which model of the pistol they may have in their collection. All three of  these models are exceptionally well made and were the best pocket pistols that Mauser produced at the time.

So which version do you have? Below are some rough model guidelines that might be able to help. Keep in mind that with-in these models there will be  sub-variations which have some minor differences. Mauser did not officially designate model names for all of these different variations of this pistol. The Mauser firm commonly referred to it as simply the model 1910. It is the collectors, historians, researchers and authors that further derived model designations based on the earliest year of significant change in design or appearance. As such, there will always be some debate when it comes to model names and variations. With that in mind, lets dig into some of the variations of this pistol and learn a little more about it. All models can have either a wood or plastic grip. The early plastic grip will have the MW(Mauser Werke) monogram while the Mauser banner is found on the late curved back plastic grip. The date of manufacture and the serial number ranges found below are credited to John LaCroix’s excellent AutoMag articles.

1910 Sidelatch, this variation was manufactured between 1910 to 1913 with a serial number range of 1 to 61000. This version is appropriately named due to the latch in the left side plate. The early versions are found with a smaller diameter safety release. This model is found with 2 different slide markings.

Humpback, this variation is very rare and was manufactured between 1912 to 1913 with a serial number range of 1 to 2800. This model is referred to as the humpback version due to a hump at the top of the slide. This model is found with many variations and slight changes to the smaller parts, but all will have a hump on the slide. The early models have a 3 line slide marking while later models have a 2 line stamping. Some collectors consider this version a prototype.  

1914 model, this variation was manufactured between 1913 to 1914 with a serial number range between 2801 to13500. This variation will be found with a 2 line slide marking.

1910/14 model, this variation was manufactured between 1914 to 1921 with a serial number range between 61000 to 221800. This variation has no latch in the side plate and will be found with 9 slide serrations on each side of the slide.

1914 model, this variation was manufactured between 1914 to 1923 with a serial number range between 13500 to 296000. This variation will be found with a single line slide stamping on the left side. Late models will not have the Mauser Banner on the left side plate. Some time around serial number 162,500 the right side of the slide is stamped “Mauser 7.65”. Around serial number 277,000 the milled panel on the frame was discontinued.   

1910/14 model, this variation was manufactured between 1921 to 1928 with a serial number range between 221800 to 345000. This version will be found with 7 slide serrations on each side of the slide.

1914 model, this variation was manufactured between 1923 to 1929 with a serial number range between 277000 to 460000. This variation will be found with a 2 line left slide stamping. The 1914 post war model is the most often encountered. It is this version that is pictured on this web page.

1914/34 model, this variation was manufactured between 1929 to 1933, with a serial number range between 460000 to 526000. This variation will have a single line left side slide marking and a straight grip. Late models will be found with a slot cut into the forward part of the slide containing the serial number. The smaller parts are finished with a potassium nitrate(saltpeter) or hot bluing process. In this hot bluing process, as the temperature is brought up, the surface turns a straw color which proceeds to blue and then to black. If it is stopped at the blue stage, the color will be a gorgeous deep royal blue not achievable any other way. Very expensive custom guns are often found blued this way.

1910/34 model, this variation was manufactured between 1928 to 1936 with a serial number range between 345000 to 403300. This variation is found with a strait grip and a single line left side slide marking. The finish is a cold blue with the smaller parts being finished in a potassium nitrate(saltpeter) or hot bluing process as described above.

1934 model, this variation was manufactured between 1933 to 1941 with a serial number range between 498250 to 617000. This variation will have a curved grip and a single line left side slide marking. The model is finished with a hot bluing process.

1910/34 model, this variation was manufactured between 1936 to 1941, with a serial number range between 403300 to 429000. This variation will have a curved grip and the only serial number showing will be on the slide. Late models will be found with a slot cut into the forward part of the slide containing the serial number.

For pictures of many of the different models, please see a pdf. document that was put together by my friend Burgess located at the MauserGuns website.  

The model 1934 was used by the German armed forces as a substitute standard sidearm. The pistol was also adopted in 1936 by the various police and security forces of Germany. The pistol saw service with the German Kriegsmarine(Navy), the Luftwaffe(Air Force) and the Wehrmacht(Army) which ordered about 8,000 pistols. 

This pistol design was also very popular with the Japanese army. The Japanese would normally label handgun ammunition by the firearm the ammunition was intended for rather than by the caliber or size of the round.  When the Japanese manufactured ammunition for the Mauser pocket pistol they labeled it just that, "mo shiki chu gata ken ju dan yaku" or  “Mauser type medium sized pistol cartridges". 

This pistol design was produced from 1910 until 1941 with close to a million pistols being manufactured. Some variations of this model are quite common, while others are extremely rare. The Mauser firm stopped production of this pistol at the beginning of WWII and replaced it with the HSC model.  

The photograph on the left is of the markings that are found on the right side of the slide of this pistol. These markings are as follows, "MAUSER - 7.65" This stamping indicates that the manufacturer of the pistol is Mauser and that the caliber is 7.65mm(.32 ACP).

The picture on the right is of the markings that are found on the left hand side of this pistol. These markings are as follows, "WAFFENFABRIK MAUSER A-G.OBERNDORF A.N." and then underneath that is "MAUSER'S PATENT" Then underneath all of this and located on the side plate of the frame is the Mauser logo. The first line translates to Mauser Weapons Factory incorporated in the city of Oberndorf on the river Neckar. The abbreviation A.G. indicates Aktiengesellschaft or literally translates to corporation. German companies that are publicly traded are designated by the letters "AG" after the company name. The letters "A.N." at the end of the top line is an abbreviation of "am Neckar" which indicates on the river Neckar. This is an important marking as there are several Oberndorfs in Germany and Austria, but there is only one Oberndorf on the river Neckar in Germany. The bottom line tells us that the pistol is made under patents that the Mauser firm holds.

The serial number is found on the four main steel parts on this model 1914 pistol. These include the full serial number on back end of frame, the full serial number on the front left side of the slide, the last four digits of the serial number on the front barrel lug and the last four digits of the serial number on the bottom of the left side plate and next to the trigger.

  

  

  

The picture on the left shows the barrel removed from the pistol. The front lug at the bottom of the barrel and under the front sight has the last 4 digits of the serial number on one side while the other side is stamped with the crown over the letter U proof mark. At the rear of the barrel, the back lug is flat on the bottom. On the Mauser model 1910 pistols, this lug has a more pointed appearance.

The photograph on the right is a picture of a crown over the letter U stamp. This stamp is located behind the rear sight as seen above, and on the front barrel lug opposite from the pistol's serial number. This crown of the letter U stamp became law on April 1, 1893 and is the final or definitive proof. This mark has not been in use since the proof law of 1939 became effective in Germany. 

The new proof law appeared in the Reichsgesetzblatt(Reich Law bulletin) No. 126 on July 15, 1939. The new proofing law stuck with the old concept that no small arm which has not been proofed by a state recognized proof house can be brought into general commerce and cannot be sold if it does not bear appropriate proof marks. Each firearm that has passed proof firing must be marked with the suitable mark or stamp. The new proof law calls for marking each of the important parts on a firearm that underwent proof firing, and the parts of the firearm that underwent separate proofing must be marked with the appropriate stamp after passing the tests.

The crown over the letter "U" proof mark is found on nearly all variations of this pistol. This proof mark was changed to the eagle over the letter "N" on late models.  

  

These next two photographs show the Mauser pocket pistol model 1914 in its field stripped condition. Besides the removal of the grip which should be done in a very careful manner to avoid damage, it takes about one minute or less to get the pistol field stripped. There is a trick to this pistol in that the magazine must be inserted then partially removed in order to dis-assemble this pistol.

The procedure goes like this, after taking the usual precautions to ensure that the firearm is not loaded, pull the slide back and locking it at the rear. Now press the catch located under the barrel and rotate the locking pin 90 degrees and pull it forward and remove it. At this point the barrel can be lifted straight up and removed. Now release the magazine and pull it out about halfway or so. Next, push it back in while holding onto the slide. As the magazine is seated the slide will start a forward motion until it is stopped by the magazine platform. Now push the slide rearward until the interlocking faces of the frame and slide are flush at the rear of the pistol. Now pull the trigger which releases the striker and remove the magazine. The slide should now slide off the frame toward the front of the pistol.

In the text at the top of this page it was discussed how Mauser redesigned the model 1914 pistol which became the model 1934. One of the major changes was the shape of the grip to fit more comfortably in the hand. Take notice that the back of the grip frame on this model 1914 pistol which looks nearly identical to that of the model 1934, is not curved and that the new design is done solely with the wood or plastic grip and not the frame.

  

Resource:

John LaCroix’s AutoMag articles

Research by Burgess and others found at the Mauser website located at: http://www.mauserguns.com/

German Handguns by Ian Hogg                

German small arms markings by Joachim Gortz & Don Bryans                

History Writ in Steel by Donald Maus               

The standard directory of proof marks by Gerhard Wirnsberger               

Official guide to gunmarks by Robert Balderson                  

Mauser military rifle markings by Terence Lapin               

Wikipedia website located at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauser  

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